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Dare I ask why the target population for this “get active” campaign was first-year female students? Is it because first-year students aren’t already insecure enough? Or because women aren’t too intimidated by the gym? Or because there aren’t already enough media messages saying “be skinny and be happy“?

It is well known that eating disorders often develop in the less-structured environment of a residential campus. Even if that were not a concern, over 90% — yes, that means almost all — of women have dieted or tried to lose weight while getting their bachelor’s degrees. (And before any troll starts the fat jokes, half of these women are normal weight.) So WHY IN THE WORLD would a social media campaign take aim at this vulnerable population? (Never mind that actual results were less stellar than reported.)

Here is a “get active” to “teenage girl” translation, in case you don’t know any teenage girls:

  • take 10,000 steps a day –> walk faster, fatso!
  • have you exercised today? –> I can’t believe you’re so lazy.
  • Eat clean! –> OMG I CAN’T BELIEVE YOU ATE ONE SQUARE OF CHOCOLATE YOU ARE SO GROSS

Healthy, right? Isn’t that JUST the message you’d want your daughter/sister/wife/friend/etc. to hear … from her school???

Nice job, U of T. Once again going the distance to prove that undergrads don’t matter.

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